Grains and Forage Blends

Pea Oatlage

  • Mix of 60% forage field peas and 40% forage oats
  • Varieties of the peas and oats used are selected for their superior forage qualities
  • Mixture can be harvested around 60 days after planting
  • Planting rate per acre: 120-150 lbs

Milo or Grain Sorghum

  • Used as an emergency crop or as summer forage
  • Planting rate per acre: 25-30 lbs
  • Planting depth: 1-1 ½ “

Japanese Millet

  • Millet is grown mainly as a forage grass and resembles barnyard grass
  • Makes the most rapid growth of all millets under favorable weather conditions, producing ripe grain in as little as 45 days
  • Annual growth habit
  • Grows 2-4 feet tall
  • Best grown on good soils and is not subject to fungal diseases, but is susceptible to several species of head smuts
  • Planting rate per acre: 25 – 40 lbs

Pearl Millet

  • Similar to sorghum/sundangrass, but doesn’t have prussic acid concerns
  • Grows  7-10 feet tall
  • Could be used for pasture and silage
  • If cut before heading out, it can produce several cuttings (leave 10 inch stubble for regrowth)
  • Planting rate per acre:  25-30 lbs

BMR (Brown Mid-Rib) Sorghum-Sudangrass Hybrid

  • Three-way cross using two sweet forage strains to make up one selection that is in turn crossed with a sweet sudan; this provides an increase in sugar and protein as well as an increase in yield per acre
  • Used for green chop, pasture, silage, and hay
  • Has less lignin and higher digestibility for better rate of gains and milk production
  • A cross between grain sorghum and sudangrass
  • Tremendous vigor and rapid re-growth
  • Planting rate per acre: 25-30 lbs
  • Planting depth: ½”-1”

Buckwheat

  • Fast growing warm season annual with a broad heart shaped leaf and white flowers
  • Branches from its nodes
  • The growth period is 10 to12 weeks in normal weather
  • Uses: cover crop – good for controlling erosion; smother crop – good for weed control, its decomposing roots suppress later weed germination; green manure crop – it builds humis and increases aeration in heavy soils; grain – mostly grown for livestock feeds
  • Planting rate per acre: 50 lbs

Field Peas

  • Variety of peas that are developed to be more productive and hardy than garden peas
  • Gaining in popularity as a forage crop
  • Field peas are usually mixed with oats, barley, or triticale and harvested as haylage
  • Combination has protein levels similar to alfalfa and has higher energy
  • Japanese Millet
  • Grown mainly as a forage grass; it resembles barnyard grass
  • Makes the most rapid growth of all millets under favorable weather conditions, occasionally producing ripe grain in 45 days
  • Growth habit is annual and has an erect plant 2 to 4 feet tall
  • Is best grown on good soils and is not subject to fungal diseases, but is susceptible to several species of head smuts
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 25-40 lbs

Hy-Rye Winter Grain Rye

  • Improved variety of winter grain rye designed for better forage and grain yield
  • Fall sown winter grain rye can be used for late fall and spring pastures
  • To maximize fall pasture, rye can be seeded as early as mid August
  • Avoid seeding rye before September for best results. Seeding in early September will usually avoid rust and ensure good stands for some fall pasture and good growth the following spring.
  • Rye can be successfully seeded as late as mid November
  • Rye can be seeded until the soil is permanently frozen
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 84 – 112 lbs

Pea Tritlage

  • Mix of 50% 4010 Forage Field Peas and 50% Triticale
  • Varieties of peas and triticale used are selected for their superior forage qualities
  • Mixture will be later in maturity and higher in protein due to the leafiness of the triticale
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 120-150 lbs

Piper Sudangrass

  • An annual warm season grass that is good for pasture, green chop, silage, and hay
  • Has a vigorous growth and can give up to four cuttings per year
  • It grows an average of 3 to 5 feet tall in solid stands and 6 to 8 feet in cultivated rows
  • Can be successfully grown on all soil types
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 20-30 lbs Planting Depth ½”-1”

Spring Barley, Robust

  • A six-rowed, smooth-awned, spring barley
  • Produces high grain yields and high test weight
  • Moderately late in heading and ripening
  • Has medium plant height and above average straw strength
  • Resistant to spot blotch and stem rust and has moderate resistance to leaf rust
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 96-120 lbs

Spring Triticale

  • A small cereal crop originating from the crossing of durum wheat and rye
  • Grown for a high producing grain and forage
  • One of the most popular ways of using this seed is to mix it with field peas
  • Mixture makes a high protein forage and can be a nurse crop for alfalfa
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 100-120 lbs

Spring Wheat, Cert. VNS

  • Variety of hard red spring wheat that has excellent stability and good yield potential with a wide area of adaptation
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 90-120 lbs

Succotash Grain Mix

  • Special mixture of 33% Multioats, 33% spring wheat, and 33% barley
  • All seed varieties are specifically chosen to ripen together and produce up to 80 bushels of high protein feed per acre
  • Can be chopped for a high protein forage
  • Can be harvested to provide a high protein, high quality feed and quality bedding straw
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 100 lbs
  • Winter Wheat, Arapahoe
  • A very high producing variety of hard red winter wheat
  • Is resistant to current prevalent races of leaf and stem rust and is moderately tolerant to Cephalosporium stripe
  • Produces a grain that has good overall bread making qualities
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 90-120 lbs

Winter Wheat, VNS

  • A listing of hard or soft red winter wheat where the specific variety is not specified
  • HY-RYE Winter Grain Rye
  • An improved variety of winter grain rye designed for improved forage and grain yield
  • Fall sown Winter Grain Rye can be used for late fall and spring pasture.
  • To maximize fall pasture, rye can be seeded as early as mid August; however, rust is sometimes a problem when rye is seeded this early
  • Seeding in early September will usually avoid rust and insure good stands for some fall pasture and good growth the following spring
  • In most years, rye can be successfully seeded as late as mid-November; rye can be seeded until the soil is permanently frozen
  • Planting Rate Per Acre: 84-112 lbs